Headgear

Ralph Schoenherr (1912-2002), Potentate of Cyprus Shrine

Ralph Schoenherr (1912-2002), Potentate of Cyprus Shrine, Albany, New York, 1959

Proctor

New York

Gift of Florence E. Connor, 2007.012.20.

In the Masonic lodge, the Master wears a top hat as a sign of his office and authority.  Other Masonic groups, such as the Shrine, and the Scottish Rite, used specialized headgear to signify membership and roles within the organization.

Shriners wear distinctive cone-shaped hats with tassels, called fezzes, at meetings and at public events. In a shape and style adopted from Middle Eastern dress, this fez features the name of the wearer’s group, or temple, on the front along with his title⁠—Potentate⁠—or leader of his Shrine.

Past Noble Grand, Grand United Order Odd Fellows

Past Noble Grand, Grand United Order of Independent Order of Odd Fellows

1890-1900

United States

Museum Purchase, 95.067a

Sculpture of an Active Member of the Scottish Rite

Sculpture of an Active Member of the Scottish Rite, 1983

Robert D. Burdette (b. 1948)

Pekin, Illinois

Gift of the Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A., 2009.066.43

Scottish Rite 32° Cap Worn by Sidney R. Baxter

Scottish Rite 32° Cap Worn by Sidney R. Baxter, 1970-1990

Dalcap

Dallas, Texas

Gift of the Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A., 2010.042.42

Worshipful Master's Top Hat

Worshipful Master's Top Hat, ca. 1900
Collins & Fairbanks
Boston, Massachusetts
Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, 98.011