What is Scottish Rite Freemasonry?

Once a Master Mason, a man may choose to join additional Masonic groups, such as the Scottish Rite. In the Scottish Rite, candidates witness a series of thirty degrees, presented as morality plays in a theater. These degrees are designed as lessons that explore philosophy, history, and ethics. Though the foundational ethics of these lessons have remained consistent over time, the characters and format have routinely changed. The degrees are conferred in the Scottish Rite’s four subordinate bodies—the Lodge of Perfection, Council of Princes of Jerusalem, the Chapter of Rose Croix, and Consistory.

Life membership certificate issued by Massachusetts Consistory to Frederick Peter Wahlgren, 1903<br />

Life membership certificate issued by Massachusetts Consistory to Frederick Peter Wahlgren, 1903

Scottish Rite Northern Masonic Jurisdiction Degrees 

Lodge of Perfection (4th through 14th Degrees)

The Lodge of Perfection Degrees, also known as the Ineffable Degrees, investigate and contemplate the ineffable name of the Deity.

Council of Princes of Jerusalem (15th and 16th Degrees)

The Council of Princes of Jerusalem Degrees explore building integrity and reverence for God.

The Rose Croix Chapter (17th and 18th Degrees)

The Rose Croix Chapter Degrees offer a candidate a deeper understanding of religion, philosophy, ethics, and history.

 Consistory (19th through 32nd Degrees)

The Consistory Degrees illustrate the creation of the ideal balance between the spiritual and the temporal.

 33rd Degree of Sovereign Grand Inspector General

The Supreme Council confers the 33rd Degree. This honorary degree is granted in recognition of individual accomplishments in private life, business, government, and the arts, as well as leadership and service within the fraternity.